october, 2022

03oct(oct 3)9:00 am11nov(nov 11)5:00 pmKeep Calm in an Anaesthetic CrisisOnlineCPD Type:Tutored CPDSubject:Anaesthesia & Analgesia,Emergency & Critical CareCPD Hours:15 hoursCost:£250 *Will run when 5 more delegates book

Course Details

Week 1
Principles of Anaesthetising Critical Patients

Anaesthetic risk in the compromised patient

The importance of patient history and physical examination

Diagnostic tests

Patient stabilisation

Anaesthetic protocol, monitoring and recovery

 

Learning objectives
After completion of this week, participants:

Gain an understanding as to why critical patients are at an increased anaesthesia and sedation risk

Understand that improving patient safety requires a holistic, overall management process, not simply using “the best drug protocol”.  This will include consideration of:

What pre-anaesthetic tests may be required and the benefit they offer

What pre-anaesthetic stabilisation may be required

Have an introduction into the type of patient monitoring which is required during the peri-anaesthetic period

Understand general principles for appropriate anaesthetic drug protocols for the critical patient

 

Week 2
General Approach to Adverse Events and Introduction to Anaesthetic Complications

Near misses and adverse events

Minimising adverse events by preparation

Checklists and non-technical skills

Common anaesthetic complications

 

Learning objectives
After completion of this week, participants:

Be able to name the three steps necessary for approaching adverse events and discuss why they are important, including methods in which near misses and adverse events can be minimised in practice.

Understand the role of human factors in patient safety and the value of checklist use in anaesthetic practice.

Have an overview of what anaesthetist non-technical skills (ANTS) are and be able to begin using them in clinical practice.

Know what the most common anaesthetic complications are encountered in small animal practice.

 

Week 3
Cardiovascular Complications

Alterations in heart rate

Bradyarrhythmias

Tachyarrhythmias

Alterations in blood pressure

Hypotension

Hypertension

 

Learning objectives
After completion of this week, participants:

Be able to recognise abnormal physiological parameters with regards to the cardiovascular system for individual patients undergoing anaesthesia.

Gain an understanding of the most common underlying causes for alterations in heart rate (bradyarrhythmias and tachyarrhythmias) during general anaesthesia.

Be able to list some main treatments for the most common arrhythmias which present under general anaesthesia.

Gain an understanding of the most common underlying causes for alterations in blood pressure (hypotension and hypertension) during general anaesthesia.

Be able to list some main treatments for the most common blood pressure alterations which present under general anaesthesia.

Begin to apply this knowledge to individual cases within the clinic with use of the available equipment

 

Week 4
Respiratory Complications

Alterations in ventilation

Hypoventilation

Hyperventilation (including tachypnoea)

Apnoea or respiratory arrest

Hypoxaemia

Respiratory obstruction

Upper respiratory tract

Lower respiratory tract

Restrictive pulmonary disease

Aspiration (and regurgitation)

 

Learning objectives
After completion of this week, participants:

Be able to recognise what are abnormal physiological parameters with regards to the respiratory system for individual patients undergoing anaesthesia.

Gain an understanding of the most common underlying causes for alterations in ventilation, including hypo- and hyperventilation, apnoea and respiratory arrest.

Be able to list the main treatments for the most common changes in ventilation under anaesthesia.

Understand the difference between hypoxaemia and hypoxia, listing the potential causes for these and therefore be able to suggest methods to manage these conditions.

Be able to recognise the clinical signs of respiratory obstruction and restrictive pulmonary disease and describe what steps could be taken to alleviate the underlying problem

Have the knowledge to state why aspiration is a risk under anaesthesia and how to manage a case of gastro-oesophageal reflux in order to minimise patient risk

Begin to apply this knowledge to individual cases within the clinic with use of the available equipment

 

Week 5
‘Other’ Complications

Central nervous system

Emergence delirium

Post anaesthetic blindness and deafness

Thermoregulation

Hypothermia

Hyperthermia

Anaphylactic and anaphylactoid reactions

Embolism

 

Learning objectives
After completion of this week, participants:

Be able to outline why cats are at particular risk for post anaesthetic blindness and deafness and describe methods which can minimise this risk.

Be able to list available methods for patient warming, with recognition of the need to counter-act patient hypothermia and the potential risks associated with warming device use.

Be able to list risk factors associated with peri-operative hyperthermia and discuss steps which can be implemented to manage the hyperthermic patient.

Have the ability to recognise if an anaphylactic or anaphylactoid reaction is occurring and be able to suggest steps to manage the situation.

Understand that embolisms are a rare, but potential complication during anaesthesia and be able to list the clinical signs associated with their occurrence.

 

Week 6
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

Detecting cardiopulmonary arrest

Basic life support

Chest compressions

Tracheal intubation

Ventilation

Advanced life support

Drug therapy

Oxygen supplementation

Intravenous fluid therapy

Correction of electrolyte and metabolic disturbances

Defibrillation

Monitoring during CPR

Post cardiac arrest care

 

Learning objectives
After completion of this week, participants:

Be able to explain the purpose of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and describe its two main components.

Recognise when cardiopulmonary resuscitation should be instigated

Understand the importance of regular CPR training within the practice team.

Be able to describe and demonstrate the method for effective chest compressions, tracheal intubation and ventilation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Have the knowledge to list what steps can be taken to provide advanced life support during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Know what monitoring tools are recommended for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and be able to interpret the main waveforms that will be seen during a resuscitation event.

 

This course will be fully tutored by Becky Robinson, and will consist of 15 hours of CPD given in various formats, including tutorials, tasks, case studies, forum discussions and quizzes.

 

Click here for further details

Time

October 3 (Monday) 9:00 am - November 11 (Friday) 5:00 pm

Location

Online

Speaker

Rebecca RobinsonBVSc, MVetMed, DipECVAA, FHEA, MRCVS EUROPEAN & RCVS SPECIALIST IN VETERINARY ANAESTHESIA, DAVIES VETERINARY SPECIALISTS

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